Meny

15—17 June, 2017

Gothenburg, Sweden

Speakers

Allison McMillan

Allison McMillan

Collective Idea

http://daydreamsinruby.com

Allison McMillan is a software developer at Collective Idea. She’s been a startup founder, community builder at the University of Michigan, and Managing Director of a national non-profit. Allison got her start at a DC Rails Girls event and is now a chapter organizer. She speaks on a variety of topics including mentorship, remote work, and being a parent and developer. When she’s not coding, you can find her encouraging her toddler’s climbing skills or pretending she has time to bake.

Topic

It’s Bigger on the Inside: Creating Learning Opportunities

In an industry where Github is your resume and you’re required to know the latest tools and technologies, finding the time to learn can be difficult when balancing responsibilities outside of work. Much of the advice on learning and staying sharp within the industry depends on the availability of an abundance of time which is not a privilege many have. But learning keeps us interested, engaged and at the top of our game. Discover actionable tools, tips, and strategies to maximize the amount of learning you can accomplish within the confines of the work day. Learn how to make the most of the time while still accomplishing your daily responsibilities to advance yourself and your career as a developer.

Andy Croll

Andy Croll

Good Scary

http://andycroll.com

Designer, Rails/iOS Developer, contract-CTO, Conference Organizer, Author, Speaker, Bootstrapper & Parent of Twins.

He’s tired a lot.

Topic

The Impermanence of Software

As engineers we place a lot of emphasis in the things that we build. However lots of the software we write is destined for deletion. What does this do to our definition of “doing great work”?

Is “great work” inherent to the code you write? Is it your customer’s results? Is it anything to do with the output in the first place?

Come and examine the role of teams, personal relationships and your own attitude in your day to day work, as well as in the broader cycle of a whole career and our industry.

Andy Delcambre

Andy Delcambre

Heroku

instagram.com/adelcambre

Andy Delcambre is an Engineer on the API team at Heroku. Previously he worked on the engineering teams at GitHub and EngineYard. His passion has always been building the infrastructure and plumbing underneath the tools for developers. Andy lives and works in Boulder, Colorado where he absolutely loves to bike, snowboard and hike, and most other outdoor activities. He also loves to cook and eat, and has traveled around the world for both.

Topic

Keeping Your Ship Afloat

You’ve been working for months or years on your new product, wrote all of the documentation, done tons of load testing, and shipped your project. It goes well for months and you are super proud of your work. And then, you get mentioned on Daring Fireball. Suddenly you have 10x more traffic than you’ve ever seen before. The site won’t load, everything is falling over, what do you do next? How do you keep your head and not flail while trying to fix the problem?

At Heroku we solve this with a consistent system of techniques that we all know to enact, each and every time something goes wrong. We know how to coordinate, we know how to communicate with each other and to our customers and we know how to discuss the problem afterward, to try to ensure that the problem doesn’t happen again. This system works because we don’t have to figure out how to do any of these things during the outage. I’ll talk about how this system works for us, and how it could be applied to your process.

Chad Fowler

Chad Fowler

Microsoft

http://chadfowler.com

Chad Fowler is an internationally known software developer, trainer, manager, speaker, and musician. Over the past decade he has worked with some of the world’s largest companies and most admired software developers. Chad is CTO Education at Microsoft. He is the author or co-author of a number of popular software books, including Rails Recipes and The Passionate Programmer: Creating a Remarkable Career in Software Development.

Topic

For Fear of Shipping

As product developers, we spend a lot of time and money doing things that are NOT about delivering great software. In this talk, we’ll explore a variety of those time-wasting activities with an eye toward focusing on what customers really care about.

Chandra Carney

Chandra Carney

Aetna Digital

http://chandracarney.com

Chandra works in healthcare and loves art history. She primarily works in Ruby and Elixir but enjoys spicing things up with accessibility advocacy the most. In her spare time she likes to count the 6 stars she can see in New York City, pet other people's dogs, find unique ways to exercise, and watch beautiful sunsets over Manhattan.

Topic

Merge Conflicts

Remote culture is the hot new topic, but what if some team members just won’t buy in? This is a story of how a remote-first team accidentally became an in-office team, despite having 80% remote workers. With a threat to take away remote work, what would happen to the team members who live far beyond city boarders? We’ll dive into ignored technical, cultural, and remote debt in this tale of two mergers, along with omens to look out for.

Keavy McMinn

Keavy McMinn

GitHub

http://keavy.com

Keavy is a software engineer at GitHub. Previously, as an independent consultant, over the previous decade, she has enjoyed pairing up with some of the top development shops across Europe and the U.S. Like many of her fellow Irishmen, Keavy enjoys telling a good story. Unlike many, she trains for Ironman triathlons and is not a fan of whiskey.

Topic

The Successful Shipper

What can I, and my company, do for me to be a successful shipper?

Lennart Fridén

Lennart Fridén

Agical AB

http://codecoupled.org/

Hailing from Stockholm, Sweden, Lennart is a consultant and software developer on a perpetual journeyman tour. An avid fan and early adopter of mob programming, he is also partial to horses, tea, and puns.

Topic

Mob It!

Remember that time when things were ablaze in production?
Remember how the entire team gathered to tackle the problem?
Remember how knowledge and ideas flowed and growed?
Remember the elation of not having to solve it all by yourself?

Imagine doing it already when developing.
Imagine doing it without the panic and the stress.
Imagine doing it all day, every day.
Imagine mob programming.

Michael Lopp

Michael Lopp

Slack

http://randsinrepose.com

Michael Lopp is a Silicon Valley-based engineering manager who builds both people and software. When he’s not worrying about staying relevant, he writes about pens, bridges, people, and werewolves at the popular weblog, Rands in Repose.

Topic

The Second Act

In order to be a historic company, you need your culture to evolve.

Nadia Odunayo

Nadia Odunayo

Ignition Works

http://ignition.works

Nadia co-founded Ignition Works in order to find fun and sustainable ways to build worthwhile software products. She has taught good engineering practices through pair programming at Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Cloud Foundry. She originally learnt to code at Makers Academy and she runs the Ruby Book Club podcast in her spare time.

Topic

This Code Sucks — A Story About Nonviolent Communication

Think about something that happened at work recently. How did it make you feel? Why did it make you feel that way?

Chances are you answered those two questions poorly. Our inability to answer such questions effectively leads us to communicate in ways that are negative and unhelpful.

Let’s explore a day in the life of a fictional programmer who, just like us, means well and wants to do a great job. We’ll use our protagonist’s story to learn about how to honestly express our needs and effectively collaborate in disagreement.

Therese Johansson

Therese Johansson

Varvet

http://varvet.com

UX Designer at Varvet and master in Interaction Design and Technologies.

Topic

How to Successfully Work in Cross-functional Teams

To develop awesome software you need to have a great team. But what is a great team? And how do you bring out the most from these individuals? This presentation covers how developers and designers should work together in order get the most out of their time and communication!